Opinion & Editorials

Opinion & Editorials

Seven countries around the world – three of them in Africa – have made faster than expected progress over the past 15 years in reducing deaths among children younger than five. These seven countries, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Senegal, were selected because they have all performed unexpectedly well in improving childhood health relative to their economic growth. ...

This month, the month of November, marks two years since Zimbabwe’s former leader, the late Robert Mugabe lost power to his long-time ally and lieutenant Emmerson Mnangagwa in a coup which was orchestrated by military commanders. We shall be doing a series of papers based on thematic areas to assess the performance of the Mnangagwa regime for the past two years. ...

I PASSED a billboard on Friday which said Government fires hundreds of doctors. My gut reaction? How stupid that is! We spend tens of thousands of dollars giving a child a primary and secondary education over a period of 16 years. ...

NEARLY a year after the Zimbabwe government realised that the country would be facing serious hunger this year, it comes as a great shock that it did not plan on how to avert this very inevitable crisis, except to vigorously thrust out its begging bowl to international donors. Revelations that government has reduced by 40% grain supplies to millers at this critical moment has exposed the authorities’ apparent laissez-faire attitude towards otherwise very serious matters. That government’s grain reserves at the Grain Marketing Board would sooner or later run out in the wake of poor harvests following an El Nino-induced drought was inescapable, internal plans should have been put in place for grain imports as soon as the country realised that the harvest would be too low to sustain the nation to another harvest. All we recall is just the much ado about nothing rhetoric that the government had everything under control and had secured supplies of the staple food from as far afield as Tanzania. The State even assured us that the largely defunct National Railways of Zimbabwe would be up and running to timely bring us the food relief. But alas, it looks like we were sold bottled smoke. ...

By Monday morning there was chaos in the Warriors camp that emanated from the Premier Soccer League’s ill-advised and shocking decision to force through a full programme between today and tomorrow as well as another round of matches on Saturday and Sunday. ...

MONDAY, November 11, marked the 54th anniversary of the Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) by then Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Douglas Smith, a move that severed the white colony from the British empire and earned it United Nations economic sanctions for 13 years. However, these were the economic boon years of Rhodesia despite a raging bush war. ...

IT comes as a seriously embarrassing affront to the Zimbabwe nation State that we are condemning hundreds, if not thousands, of fellow brothers and sisters to Statelessness simply because one or both their parents are unknown to them, which makes it impossible for them to obtain identity documents (IDs) under the country’s very strange laws that unashamedly trample on basic human rights. Having an ID is one of the most basic human rights that should not be so complicated and made to appear to be so sacred that a whole nation conspires to deny fellow citizens the right to belong somewhere. ...

This has been one of the most deluded period for the Zimbabwe government - even by its own inherently schizophrenic standards — firstly claiming that providing low salaries to workers was economically prudent as it attracted foreign direct investment (FDI), since companies preferred investing in countries with cheap labour, then later announcing that it intended inviting back foreign-based specialist doctors — yet, clearly failing to adequately care for its own local contingent of medical practitioners. ...

Whenever you are asked whether or not you are ready to retire, you will laugh and say “Of course not”. I have met a lot people who are in their late 50s and still working and whenever l bring up the topic on retirement, they often shudder. In fact, just the mere mention of the word makes their mood shift to “down”. They have acquired many skills and knowledge, but still those nearing 60 years of age feel more than agitated about the mere thought of retirement. I think it’s an old belief that being 60 years of age means being “old and tired”, the reason is that people should retire to something, not just retire from something. ...

It is simple: The tragedy of the over two-months doctors’ strike is that Zimbabwe has two finely distinct groups; those who feel (the majority) the impact of the strike and those who talk (the minority) about it. ...

MUCH as we should be rejoicing and dancing mad in the streets that government will, starting today, drip-feed a billion dollars of our already inflation-gnawed currency into the ...

The socio-economic situation in our country has once again moved to another painful level. ...

THE year will soon be over and we will be doing a stock take that's if you haven't already started. A substantial number of us have missed opportunities in life. ...

While the rest of the country was still wondering what the government was thinking when it fired 77 doctors working at public hospitals which now resemble ghost buildings, it went ahead and dismissed 134 more, bringing the total to 211. ...

LAST week I shared my love story with Percy, basically explaining how different we are! Despite our differences, however, due to intentionally preparing for marriage, we have enjoyed over 15 years of wedded bliss!! ...

Undeniably Zimbabwe is going through a critical and a painful phase. The next generation might blame us for not having planted the right seeds, for them to harvest. ...

ZIMBABWE’S political landscape is so littered with all manner of wreckage from past deadly and bloody battles that for someone to then try and make sense of how ...

Mokgweetsi Masisi’s decisive victory in the recent Botswana elections over a coalition backed by his former boss, Ian Khama, is the culmination of an astonishing 10-year political career. ...

IN April, famed South Sudanese journalist, Alfred Taban, passed away in Kampala, Uganda. A former BBC correspondent, Taban was among the first reporters to cover the genocide in ...

What comes to mind when Mozambique is mentioned? In most cases it is the negative stereotype – a bastion of devastating cyclones, civil war, poverty, famine and diseases. ...

THREE weeks ago, human resources consultant and columnist Memory Nguwi posted a tweet on whether professionals should be paid to attend workshops. ...

NARRATIVES are essential. Humans are, after all, “helpless story junkies”. Business and economic success depend, much more than is commonly acknowledged, on getting the narrative right. And if there is a narrative where getting it right or wrong matters hugely, it is the narrative about Africa’s industrial development. ...

DICTATORS are not born, but created by “we the people” due to political, economic and social conditions obtaining in a country. In dire economic and political situations, “we the people” are desperate for quick solutions to our problems to the extent that we fail to see the writing on the wall. The French, Germans, Italians and Spaniards — the list is endless — did not see it coming because they were mired in debilitating political and economic crises. Dictators emerge from such environments as “we the people” expect a Messiah to usher us into a land flowing with milk and honey. ...

ONE of the greatest ancient Greek playwrights and poets, Euripides, famous for the many tragedies he wrote, including Medea and The Bacchae – which probed the darker side of human nature, once wrote: “Those whom God wishes to destroy, he first makes mad.” (c. 485-406 BC) And for anyone who has bothered to follow Zimbabwe’s topsy turvy tragic political affairs from the days of racist Ian Douglas Smith till today, at varying stages in the life of this nation, events and behaviours of those in power have aptly proved Euripides’ prophetic assertion. ...

IN a country battling an unprecedented economic turmoil and social upheaval, it is nothing short of bizarrely tragic that a group of young people would vow to defend a government that has been the biggest contributor to their own suffering through “austerity measures” that seem designed to richly punish the poor. ...

ZIMBABWE has always toyed around with the idea of an imperial presidency since Ian Douglas Smith’s Unilateral Declaration of Independence on November 11, 1965.The late former President Robert Mugabe, using Zanu PF’s parliamentary majority, did not waste time in entrenching his imperial presidency by causing the enactment of constitutional amendment No.7 of 1987 that created the all-powerful Executive President ...

Zimbabwe has undergone profound socio-economic changes, which have inadvertently impacted on the previously thriving traditional care facilities for older persons.The traditional household care was, of course, primary, with medical facilities being “referral” institutions especially for routine medical checks or serious conditions warranting the doctor’s attention. ...

Joram Gumbo, the former Transport minister, has been arrested for his actions around the Zimbabwe Airways controversy. But it tells a story of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s feeble anti-corruption drive that none of the charges Gumbo faces shed any real light into the scandal that led to the country ending up paying millions for planes that it never used. ...

Did you know that today’s business environment is actually becoming ever more Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous (Vuca). A Vuca business environment poses many challenges to organisations and only the prepared and agile will survive such an environment. Truth be told, HR practitioners need to attend to how your organisations respond to issues of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity, because the world is getting more and more Vuca every single day. ...

There is a border which draws a sharp line between Mexico and the United States of America. Now the US makes this line even less surmountable. More and more barbed and sharpened wires create more and more fences and obstacles of hundreds of miles. Why? What for? ...