Born-free exhibition depicts contemporary challenges

0
756

THE inaugural edition of the Born Free Exhibition currently running at the National Art Gallery is a sound epitome of post-independence life relayed through visual arts.

BY KENNEDY NYAVAYA

While generations that came after 1980 have for long been deemed as taking the liberation struggle for granted, the 24 artistes whose works are being showcased have arguably proven the claim unfounded.

Dubbed ”A Whole New Mind”, the exhibition which started on April 16 and will end on June 15 has its focus on presenting the other side to how the youths are viewed by older generations that witnessed the liberation struggle.

It is an assertion of importance of the young generation and examines recurring challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap of realities in light of issues of identity, religion and history.

Speaking to NewsDay about his fine art piece titled “1980 Legacy”, upcoming artist, Michael Hela, said “born frees” should not contaminate the legacy of freedom left for them by those that fought the liberation struggle.

“The reason why I participated in this exhibition is because I believe our freedom is a legacy that should live on and as the new generation we should not pollute it,” he said.

While some of those born after independence have failed to relate to the liberation struggle and its importance, the exhibition is a show of how every generation has its own struggles and how the post-independence generation is grappling with
fighting corruption and unemployment.

Artistes with their artwork on show include Kudakwashe Dongo, Tinashe Katandawa, Kudzanai Mavhura, Takudzwa L Guzha, Joe Chinomona, Thomas Mwasangale, Munyaradzi Mugorosa, Johnson Zuze, Nancy Mteki, Edwin A Chinyama, Tsungai W Mangwade, Franklyn Dzingai, Clive T Mukucha, Tafadzwa Gwetai, Salanje Sky, Mavis Tauzeni, Vimbainashe Mangoma, Tatenda Zangira, Admire Kamudzengerere, Darlington Tarumbwa, Michael Hela, Isaac Choloka, Keith Zenda and Option Nyahunzvi.