Conservation leadership key to Africa’s future

Wildlife and ecology expert, Edson Gandiwa, believes developing the capacity of youth to tackle conservation challenges is the key to unlocking Africa’s potential.


“It is important have young people with a positive attitude towards contributing to the sustainable socio-economic development of the country,” he says.

A professor in the School of Wildlife, Ecology and Conservation at Chinhoyi University of Technology (CUT), Gandiwa was selected as a 2014 Washington Fellow, part of President Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative, and will join 29 other Zimbabweans as part of a contingent of 500 youth from across the African continent.

He will spend six weeks in a rigorous academic program at Wagner College (New York), where he hopes to learn about leadership in environmental related issues.

“On my return to Zimbabwe, I hope to enhance my contribution to the training of young students in conservation leadership and capacity building of stakeholders involved in natural resources conservation based on experiences from the program,” says Gandiwa.

He says he is honored to be part of the Washington Fellowship, which he sees as an “opportunity to expand knowledge and collaborate with other young leaders through networking and learning from each other’s diverse experiences.”

Edson has published over 50 research articles in international and regional peer-reviewed scientific journals and conference proceedings. His current research interests include: community based natural resource management, wildlife conservation, population ecology, media framing of wildlife conservation and plant ecology.

Edson is a 2004 graduate of the National University of Science of Technology (Bulawayo, Zimbabwe) in Environmental Science and Health.

He also earned a Master’s degree in Tropical Resource Ecology from the University of Zimbabwe (2007). In 2013, he earned a Doctorate degree in Wildlife Conservation at Wageningen University in The Netherlands.

In March this year, he was appointed Executive Dean of the School of Wildlife, Ecology and Conservation at the Chinhoyi University of Technology based in Mashonaland West.

His career has included assignments as a Wildlife Ecologist for the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority based in Gonarezhou National Park, Chiredzi as well as working as a Project Assistant Officer for Christian Care, Zimbabwe.

11 Responses to Conservation leadership key to Africa’s future

  1. francis Muzenda June 2, 2014 at 3:49 pm #

    Well done Edson. Asi fundo murikufamba nayo wena

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  3. Pat June 2, 2014 at 6:42 pm #

    So proud of you!!!

  4. T.J Mabvure June 2, 2014 at 8:02 pm #

    Bhora mberi mberi

  5. Gabes Shatumbu June 2, 2014 at 8:17 pm #

    SADAC and whole Africa is behide you. work very hard.

  6. mai Gandiwa June 2, 2014 at 8:18 pm #

    A young African Leader in who understands the science and art of Conservation. Go and say hi to that brother of yours in the white house, then come back with a bang!!!

  7. Emru Kunanti June 5, 2014 at 4:49 pm #

    Zvinokudzwa mdhara. Endai munodzidza modzoka motodzidzisawo.

  8. Colm Barry June 6, 2014 at 3:19 pm #

    the vicious circle, looking back through all of history, seems to have been that conservation is always on the “back burner” once people are struggling to make ends meet. Deforestation, desertification often being the end results. As long as (see the “tragedy of the commons”) there are resources that one needs (like e.g. firewood) and cannot substitute for there will be a conflict between conservation and survival. I think Africa (in general, certainly different states are different of course) is still in a disadvantaged position in this regard.

  9. Nomore Tupulu June 6, 2014 at 9:59 pm #

    Proud to be part of the 50. Keep it up

  10. Ziraways June 10, 2014 at 12:16 pm #

    Welldone Prof Gandiwa.I am happy for you Executive Dean.

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