Opinion & Editorials

Opinion & Editorials

IT would appear Zimbabweans have not learnt their lessons from the past as seen in the panic buying of basic commodities that started early this week. ...

CRACKDOWNS on “illegal” street traders by officers from the local authorities are now a daily occurrence despite the fact that street vending is also an important part of ...

EVERYONE recognises that Finance Minister Mthuli Ncube has the duty and obligation to stabilise the economy, for that is the wish of pretty much every one of Zimbabwe’s ...

SECTION 56 of the Constitution provides that “All persons are equal before the law and have the right to equal protection and benefit of the law”. In theory, ...

A GOOD corporate reputation is vital for an organisation to perform well. In this present and highly competitive world of work, organisations that stand the test of time ...

IT is pleasing to see that calls for political reforms are gaining traction just two months after elections. ...

SOMETIMES it’s nice to be right, that does not often happen, but in this case I am sorry that those of us who had said we are headed ...

CLIMATE change engagement for sustainable development is ideologically tilted in favour of rich and powerful nations, which, in turn, produce more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. ...

WHEN Finance minister Mthuli Ncube indicated in his Monetary Review Statement that Zimbabweans should tighten their belts and brace for the worst, as the government seeks to correct ...

IT would appear Zimbabweans have not learnt their lessons from the past as seen in the panic buying of basic commodities that started early this week. This has, in some cases, consequently created artificial shortages as people hoard basic goods in their homes. But the truth of the matter is that no matter how much you can store, it will always run out as long as there is a genuine shortage on the market. ...

The past two weeks witnessed key policy pronouncements by President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s administration that Members of Parliament must unpack and debate extensively in order to give impetus to the quest to revive the ailing economy. Parliament, mandated by the Constitution to oversee use of public resources, has a central role to play in the resolution of the crisis. ...

NOT all days will make you smile. Some may bring smiles, but others may pile misery on your disturbed mind. But just be strong and courageous. Be resistant to all opposing forces. Be a fighter and a real warrior. ...

When the leader stops people from asking questions, that leader has become dangerous to the very people he leads. Questions are crucial. Even our very own leaders in Zimbabwe owe us answers. ...

THE current socio-economic crisis in the country is untenable and demands that the two major political parties — Zanu PF and the MDC Alliance — hammer some kind of deal that will help better the lot of citizens who are now burdened beyond measure by the two protagonists’ endless bickering, while the country is on fire. ...

“In this world, nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes,” observed presciently Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), one of the founding fathers of the United States, who was both a philomath — a seeker of knowledge and facts; and a polymath — a person of wide knowledge and learning, whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas, known to draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems. ...

SOMETHING that has become very worrying for me is the misuse of personal information since the election period and in this edition, we consider the importance of this and steps to be taken to minimise the abuse of personal information. ...

Two important draft pieces of legislation were gazetted last week, paving the way for their introduction in Parliament. ...

Announcing fiscal measures on Monday, Finance and Economic Development minister Mthuli Ncube said the intermediated money transfer tax had been reviewed from five cents per transaction to two cents per dollar transacted, effective October 1, 2018. The decision is a threat to the much-anticipated financial inclusion. ...

THERE is no debate that Zimbabwe was never going to return to stability and sustainable growth swiftly, without any hitches, pain and hard decisions. ...

A FORTNIGHT ago, President Emmerson Mnangagwa officially opened the first session of the Ninth Parliament of Zimbabwe, delivering a State of the Nation Address (Sona) that elicited various reactions among Zimbabweans. For the optimists, the President’s speech created hope because of the promise of economic revival. ...

IN Zimbabwean writer Shimmer Chinodya’s Harvest of Thorns novel, there is a description of the main character’s father, Mr Tichafa, as probably having been the best minister of Finance that Rhodesia probably never had. This was because he (the father) was running the family on a minimum wage budget, with what his son considered amazing resourcefulness. ...

WOMEN in Zimbabwe constitute about 54% of the population of about 14 million people. In the just-ended 2018 harmonised elections, statistics compiled by Women In Politics Support Unit (WiPSU) indicate that there were 1 176 women out of 5 620 candidates that were nominated to run for local government council seats yet only 261 women were actually elected as councillors out 1 958 wards, which is 13,3% of all the council seats. ...

CLIMATE change is a reality and its effects on the livelihood of smallholder farmers is detrimental to their survival. The possibility of the smallholder farmers of coming out ...

It is highly unusual for a prospective Finance minister to telegraph his thoughts on an economy he is about to superintend over, letting all and sundry know what to expect from him. ...

VENDORS and street traders are harassed by the forces of law and order. They are beaten, have their merchandise confiscated or destroyed. Why? ...

ANJAN Sundaram is an award-winning journalist who has reported from Africa for the New York Times. His 2016 book, Bad News: Last Journalists in a Dictatorship, is particularly insightful on how President Paul Kagame is managing his Rwanda miracle. ...

I GOT a phone call from a man in Bulawayo who said he wanted to see me on a personal matter. We arranged to meet and he told me that he had worked for a major and well-known company for 40 years. The company in question is a US multinational selling a leading brand of a consumer item. ...

In year 2014, I wrote an article explaining why the government should bring back our own local currency, and I was bashed by all and sundry. I am expecting the same reaction in response to this article. ...

DISSATISFIED customers are inevitable in each and every line of business due to many reasons. The existence of “dissatisfied customers” is not a myth but a reality in organisations’ day to day operations. ...

That vehicular traffic in Harare has become untenable, especially during peak hours, is an understandable. It is now a nightmare, and this is one of the major challenges that the capital’s new mayor, Herbert Gomba, and his team, need to tackle head-on as a matter of priority. ...