Zacc toothless

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Letters to the editor

CORRUPTION remains the single most successful institution in the country employing several thousands of people, particularly those in high offices and their hangers-on.

Media houses are doing a sterling job criticising government excesses, mostly  corruption.

Interestingly, as corruption thrives, its architects feign philanthropic inclinations, sponsoring sporting events and funding several government-related activities, among other things.

The Government of Zimbabwe, as a bureaucratic institution, has workers who mostly survive on corruption, with syndicates which solicit bribes for services rendered, among them, the issuance of documents such as passports.

Those unwilling to play ball may discover, albeit belatedly, what a waste of time it is for one to seek to adhere to the straightforward way of doing business.

In the end, it’s underhand deals or the brown envelope that carries the day.

Even the much-needed foreign direct investors are not immune.

Zimbabwe’s Anti-Corruption Commission is another big yawn; it lacks the muscle to independently deal with the rot that is prevalent in the country.

Stiff penalties are the way to go for Zimbabwe.

All suspects must be investigated and if necessary prosecuted, irrespective of their social status.

Zacc chairperson Loice Matanda-Moyo has proved she  has no guts to fight corruption. She has failed and should be relieved of her duties.

Zimbabwe must turn the corner and do things differently if the country is to adopt a new socio-economic trajectory.

The Zanu PF government must allow the law to operate independently. Period.Disgusted

Devolution should include learning sector

NOW that devolution is enshrined in the Constitution, it should be embraced in the education sector.

The current education policies restrict planning and co-ordination of education to the minister and the permanent secretary who are based in Harare.

Funding is also done at national level without input of the regions.

Our country is heterogeneous hence different regions have different educational needs.

Provincial councils should be trusted with part of the education planning, including coming up with some components of the curriculum.

Section 264(2)(b) of the Constitution cites the objective of devolution as to recognise the right of communities to manage their own affairs and to further their development.

Education planning is linked to development and if we are sincere with the devolution agenda, then the Education Act should address the issue of devolving education planning.

When planning is devolved, it is easy to attract funding from local business operators since they are connected to the educational goals.Muzokomba villager

Sadc must condemn SA xenophobic attacks

WHEN will Southern African Development Community (Sadc) convene an extraordinary summit to discuss the events unfolding in South Africa.

Each time Sadc leaders meet for their routine jamborees, they have failed to construct clear economic and political frameworks to rescue the region from poverty and political instability.

Zimbabwe, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Mozambique have been problem children for some time.

Of late, eSwatini has stuck out like a sore thump.

They massage each other for stealing elections. They praise each other for looting the scarce resources we have and the only economic strategy they agree on is the one that mortgages our region to the highest bidder.

Youths in the region are unemployed and are becoming desperate.

In an embarrassing indictment to our Pan-African values, young people in South Africa are turning against their African brothers and sisters.

Two weeks ago, immigrant, Elvis Nyathi was killed in cold blood in Johannesburg.

Afrophobic attacks have spread to Durban and other cities in South African and unsurprisingly Sadc has remained mum.

Immigrants from Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, among others are the main targets.

Sadc should condemn the barbaric xenophobic manslaughter underway in South Africa.

Our own Zimbabwean government is tongue-tied at a time when its nationals domiciled in that country needs it most, with the South African government simply paying lip service with its many apologies.

Trade unions and civic society organisations in South Africa should take a leading role in providing civic education to the xenophobic element.

South African security services should act swiftly to stamp out these attacks. It is high time the Zimbabwean government abandoned the neo-liberal economic agenda it is pursuing and prioritise inclusive wealth creation.

I don’t think we will be asking too much by demanding a Press statement from the Zimbabwean government.Mukunda Chitova