Drill music is here to stay — Brian Jeck

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Brian “Brian Jeck’’ Kadyamarunga

BY TATENDA CHITAURO

DRILL music artiste Brian “Brian Jeck’’ Kadyamarunga says the genre, that started in the United Kingdom, attracted interest across the globe and is here to stay.

Brian Jeck became talk of the showbiz after he remixed American rapper Pop Smoke’s billboard single titled Dior with a track titled Tungidza Moto, which was his first experimental drill track.

The song was well received by drill fans across the country and the continent.

In an interview with NewsDay Life & Style the Chegutu-based singer said he was happy to be one of the pioneers of Drill music in Zimbabwe.

“The Zim-drill movement is a new culture which has never been experienced here before. We introduced ourselves as Zim-drillers and on my journey, I have also realised that other artiste such as Voltz JT and NKiller are pushing the genre,” he said.

“Drill music is going big this year, the genre is still young, and we are seeing its sound continuing to blossom. We are going to introduce new characters and new artistes as well this year.”

Brian Jeck is hopeful that Zim-drill will soon reach international stardom.

He said he was courting international drillers such Central C and Abracadabra from the United Kingdom.

“My message to all aspiring drill artistes is that they should never be afraid of competition from well-established artistes because we need more drillers in Zimbabwe,” he said.

“I will be dropping my second album on my birthday (March 9) titled Unicorn which means one of a kind. I am also currently working with Leo V from Letter Z productions, Big Billz Media and Key Africa from South Africa in shooting my music videos,” he said.

“I recently dropped a video for my song called Vafana ve Drip which speaks about fashionistas who introduce the latest trends and designs of colourful clothes and jewellery.

“The song also endorses boutiques selling the merchandise to the people pushing the new wave of drill culture.”

He, however, bemoaned the state of the music terrain describing it as full of detours.

“The road is not always smooth as we encounter some setbacks and some of the challenges we are facing are proper marketing, management and sponsorship, but we are trying our best to put our work out there,” he said.

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