HomeNewsShuramurove introduces a different feel

Shuramurove introduces a different feel

-

THE Zimbabwean musical scene is yearning for something different and whoever has something different is sure to be smiling all the way.

SILENCE CHARUMBIRA
ENTERTAINMENT REPORTER

Think of Jah Prayzah who, besides his exceptional talent, has an extra edge due to his genre.

It worked for the several old school Zimbabwean bands all of which had something different to offer.

But that has since changed with everyone who has been mesmerised by Alick Macheso’s music seeming to copy his eccentric bass skills.

So has been the case with the late Tongai Moyo whose majority of followers are sweating to fit into his own groove.

Interestingly, music lovers have become wise and do not just jump because someone has strummed a meaningful note that sounds like one they have heard before.

So when one hears music from one Shuramurove they are destined to pay attention simply because they have not heard the music before.

Born Chenjerai Mavhiki on February 25 1977 in Mhangura, Shuramurove found himself engrossed by different musicians like Thomas Mapfumo, Oliver Mtukudzi and Safirio Madzikatire, among others.

“Being in a mining environment, I could see all those musicians so often and that my late mother was a prominent lead singer in the Salvation Army only made it ‘worse’. I remember at four I was making plastic and tin drums imitating the bands that I would have seen,” said Shuramurove.

“It only got deeper when the late Admire Kasenga, who also resided in the same area, came to our house one day when I was busy with my friends. Kasenga was wooing this girl who stayed at number B8 while we were at B14 and he wanted us to help call the girl.

“After his mission was accomplished he invited me over to Hoshkoch where he used to rehearse and from then I never stopped.”

Shuramurove was to leave the mine in 1988 for his rural home in Rwodzi Village under Chief Bepura in Mashonaland Central until he finished his secondary education.

He was to join the police force after school in 1996, but the music dream did not die.

“I later left the police force and worked for different companies, but still in the security department before I went to Botswana briefly before settling in South Africa. While in South Africa I tried to go back to music, but it did not work,” he said.

The musician managed to record an album Ndichamuti Ani in 2003 while he was now based in Norton.

In Norton he was to meet Kasenga again who was now residing in Kuwadzana.

After Kasenga’s death he was to tag along Ngosimbi Crew bassist Robson Bakali (now late) with whom he recorded another album at Gramma Records that remains unreleased.

“Things were bad those days and we left that album with Peter Muparutsa who engineered it,” he said.

Shuramurove is now on the verge of releasing his yet-to-be-titled new album and says he is busy rehearsing with his band at Artisan Studios.

“We are still weighing our options on the venue of the launch and the dates, but it will be at the end of the month,” Shuramurove said.

The musician said the name Shuramurove was inspired by the rain bird that appears to be in sync with nature at all times.

“The rain bird lives in harmony with nature and when it comes, you know the rain is coming and that is what my music is about. Things may be bad now, but just as you see the rain bird you know you will not die of hunger. There will not be a drought. When the rain comes it gives life and this is what our music intends to do,” he said.

“The music is advisory to different social spheres despite one’s position. Even politicians will benefit from this music.”

Shuramurove has so far released a single titled Ella.

The track that is accompanied by a video carries a different feel whose drumming and bass may fit into the reggae genre while it has a dominant keyboard that spells out African music.

According to the singer, the genre is also called Shuramurove Music.

The beautiful video is, nevertheless, almost spoiled by uncreative dancers who fail to go along with the song’s tempo.

The love song should, however, be good enough to arouse interest to different audiences due to the smooth flow of its on point storyline.

Recent Posts

Stories you will enjoy

Recommended reading