Drought stalks masvingo

MASVINGO province faces acute food shortages as drought has swept across most parts of the province, leaving many without enough food to see them through to the next harvest, a government official has said.

REPORT BY TATENDA CHITAGU

“We have a huge food deficit because of the low crop yields, the harvest were far from satisfactory.

“We have drought,” provincial Agritex officer Paul Poshai told NewsDay, ominously adding that things were not well.

“There are poor harvests and food assistance is needed. The season started late and ended early. This resulted in reduced area under food crops. The season quality is poor and the food security is precarious.”

The most affected areas, Poshai said, were the low lying districts of Chiredzi, Mwenezi, Gutu and Chivi.

Poshai, however, said he did not have figures of the households that will need food handouts as well as the actual deficit in food security.

The province is susceptible to droughts and many communal farmers, whose livelihoods depend on agriculture, have been facing food shortages for the past decade, making them perennial candidates for food aid.

Meanwhile, Vandalism of infrastructure and poor water supplies could hamper this year’s winter wheat cropping season in Masvingo, with hectarage falling from 5 000 hectares to 161 hectares last year.

Poshai said winter wheat planting should have started on Wednesday, but the province was yet to receive seed and other farming inputs.

“We are still waiting for seed and fertilizer. Seed is very critical because it is difficult to get, while fertilizer can be found,” he said. “Farmers are also not showing interest in growing wheat.”

Poshai said most irrigation schemes had collapsed owing to dwindling water levels and vandalism.

“Water is key, but if it is not available, then we cannot grow anything. Most schemes have dried up and collapsed owing to vandalism, yet these were the growing sites,” he said.

Poshai said most farmers were now shunning wheat production owing to water shortages.

“We have received a drop in the number of farmers who have shown interest,” he said.

“Although this year we have not yet identified them, we had a major drop in winter wheat hectarage, from around 5 000 hectares to 161 last year.”

12 Responses to Drought stalks masvingo

  1. Kelvin Mapungwe May 6, 2013 at 7:06 am #

    Tinokumbirawo gvt imhanyemhanye.Yes we understand that the area is prone to drought,but I urge you all to invest the little you hve in growing wheat to hamper such a hazardous event.Finally, my bretherenGod will not let you alone if you lift up your eyes unto him as he deals with what we think is impossible.

    • kedo May 6, 2013 at 8:11 am #

      can you See how a Zimbabwean poor woman became a millionaire just by buying and selling accidented cars, Very interesting idea. Go to (ACCIDENTEDCARS.COM) to see the various methods and companies she was using. (ACCIDENTEDCARS.COM). WAKE UP AFRICANS

    • Phunyukabemphethe May 6, 2013 at 1:06 pm #

      Zim Independent

      Shona administrators must prove they are capable
      By Kudakwashe Marazanye
      I WAS moved by Zimbabwe Saints supporters who were singing with nostalgia
      about their team’s good old days, “.mutserendende, mutserendende,
      mutserendende Dr Love Matavire. ndakambonetsa. kumira neni aive makomborero
      mumvuri womuvonde.”

      Just like Matavire Chikwata chakambonesta and their supporters once walked
      tall. I could not help reminiscing over the good days at Saints.

      Which Saints fan does not have fond memories for the Super Saints of Ephraim
      Chawanda, Henry Mckop, Joseph Machingura etc? I still remember how the
      Saints family was crestfallen when we lost a final to a Shakeman
      Tauro-inspired Caps United in 1979. Aah! Vakomana, choenda here Chikwata?
      With such a distinguished footballing history, what has gone wrong at the
      once-famed Chikwata?

      There is a discernable trend of Shona failure in this and many other cases
      of administrative bungling in this country. Unfortunately this trend only
      serves to reinforce long held stereotypes of Shona dishonesty and bad
      management. Traditionally, whites have had contempt for the cowardly and
      ignoble Mashona and grudging respect for the proud and brave Ndebele.

      The Ndebele had and still harbour contempt for the fickle amasvina. The
      Ndebele still have an unkind refrain about the Shona – thathekile mota
      yamasvina. When in a charitable mood, the Ndebele argue that the problem
      with the Shonas is that they are full of I know, omaningindaba,
      vanamandihindini. So, traditionally, the Shona have always been at the
      bottom of the ethnic pecking order.

      That is why most whites would have preferred a Ndebele government to a Shona
      one in 1980. In their view, Ndebele hands in government were more
      responsible than Shona ones. After all they had wrested the country from the
      Ndebele on their arrival. Even during the liberation war, it was generally
      held that Zipra cadre were a more professional force than Zanla’s army of
      contemptible garden boys turned terrorists. Peter Godwin says as much in his
      book Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa. With the current problems our country is
      facing, blamed mainly on mismanagement, white liberals are quick to distance
      themselves from President Robert Mugabe declaring that “. I was an Inkomo
      man.”

      Against such a background, it is in the interest of the Shona to prove
      history and their detractors wrong. But instead, the Shona seem to be hell
      bent on confirming such prejudices about their ethnic group. Dynamos and
      Saints are both Shona clubs and they are both in an administrative mess. It
      is a scandalous shame that the Shona in Bulawayo now have to turn to
      Highlanders for a soccer team to root for after the demise of Saints. Even
      the Shona players in Bulawayo have to go to Highlanders to launch a career
      in football when in the past they naturally went to Saints.

      Generations of Ndebele and Shona youngsters in Bulawayo had a healthy,
      non-antagonistic rivalry on the soccer pitch to establish which group of
      youths was better. This good-natured rivalry extended to the members of the
      two ethnic groups at work places and in the various drinking places.

      The kind of friendly rivalry you see in Amakhosi’s Foromani and Sakhamuzi.

      But with the demise of Saints, Shonas in Bulawayo now shamelessly consider
      themselves as members of the Highlanders family, both as players and
      supporters. This is despite the humiliating taunts they are subjected to
      like “okungama buya-buya lokhu; .okungamasvina lokhu.” as correctly depicted
      by Amakhosi at the Highlanders Annual Prize Giving Day last year. At
      national level, soccer administration is largely in the hands of Shonas,
      with Leo Mugabe, a Shona at the helm. At this level the sport is also
      generally in the doldrums due to administrative incompetence.

      Apparently Ndebele administrative superiority over the Shonas is not
      confined to football. The city of Bulawayo is the country’s shining beacon
      in local government administrative excellence. Whilst corruption and
      mismanagement have cost Harare (and some Shona cities too) its glamour
      status, Bulawayo has been relatively well run. And Bulawayo, it must be
      remembered, is the heart and soul of Matabeleland.

      In business, Ndebele businessmen are generally known for their financial
      prudence and modesty. They are also known for their social responsibility to
      their Ndebele community – even though the money might have been made in the
      much-loathed Mashonaland. Over the years we have had Ndebele businessmen
      pouring money into Highlanders for its Champions League campaign and to
      sustain their foreign coach, Eddie May. We have had Delmar Lupepe coming up
      with his Amazulu, Titus Ncube and Chemist Siziba amongst others, sponsoring
      Highlanders. Of course the Bulawayo-based Ndebele businessmen would do well
      to discard their Bantustan mentality where they want the Bulawayo business
      arena to be rid of foreigners (read Shonas).

      The corollary to that warped thinking is that the Ndebele sons making money
      in Harare and other areas outside Matabeleland should be chucked out of
      these areas. So Delma Lupepe, Trevor Ncube, Tammy Msimanga and others who
      have thriving businesses in Mashonaland would have to close shop.
      Ultra-Ndebele nationalism may be good for Highlanders but it is certainly
      bad for ethnic relations. In contrast to the financial discipline, social
      responsibility and modesty displayed by Ndebele businessmen, Shona
      businessmen are given to obscene ostentation. They parade their opulent
      villas and cars, firing guns at funerals in the fashion of gangsters, which
      the less charitable say is exactly what they are.

      Parastatals headed by Ndebele boys also seem to fare better compared to
      those run by their Shona counterparts.

      The Zimbabwe Investment Centre under Nicholas Ncube and the then Cotton
      Marketing Board under Sylvester Nguni were some of the better run
      quasi-government organisations.

      From the foregoing, it is clear that the Shona may well have earned a
      reputation as incompetent, out and out crooks driven by the love for money,
      much like the Nigerians. This does not do any good to their tribe’s standing
      in society, and they should work hard to correct such perceptions and
      stereotypes.

      Because of these negative stereotypes of Shonas, there has been muted talk
      in some circles about whether things wouldn’t have been better in Zimbabwe
      under the late Joshua Nkomo and his PF-Zapu.

      l Kudakwashe Marazanye is a Harare-based freelance writer.

      marazanyek@yahoo.co.uk

      • tasara May 6, 2013 at 4:15 pm #

        of course you are not a marazanye, but a ndebele at the core, in fact your hatred of the shonas is dangerous for the country and for the ndebeles at that. Thats why you are a freelance juno. we call that irresponsible journalism(freelance). I hope your prejudice against the shonas will not be contagious.

        • Phunyukabemphethe May 6, 2013 at 5:20 pm #

          @tasara
          How can marazanye be prjudiced against himself. Why not write him since he has given his email address and hear where he is coming from.

  2. kedo May 6, 2013 at 8:10 am #

    See how a Zimbabwean poor woman became a millionaire just by buying and selling accidented cars, Very interesting idea. Go to (ACCIDENTEDCARS.COM) to see the various methods and companies she was using. (ACCIDENTEDCARS.COM). WAKE UP AFRICANS

  3. Phunyukabemphethe May 6, 2013 at 10:05 am #

    Zimbabwe the Next Genocidal Killing Field
    by Austin Bay
    October 30, 2002
    In 1932, who believed Germans would systematically slaughter German Jews by the millions? In spring of 1994, how many of us in an allegedly savvier, Internet-informed world were ready to believe Rwandan Hutus intended to hack to death 800,000 Tutsis in an orgy of macabre machete violence?

    Pay attention to Zimbabwe, a nation brutalized by the rapidly decaying regime of dictator Robert Mugabe. Zimbabwe may well be the next genocidal killing field, with the Matebele tribe the target of Mugabe’s Shona.

    Last February, this column described Mugabe as the Slobodan Milosevic of Africa. Both the Shona and the Serb are thieves, “former Marxists” and ethnic cleansers who provoke ethnic strife, incite economic envy, murder opponents and do so under the propaganda cover of righting long-term historical wrongs. For beasts like Mugabe and Milosevic, “righting historical wrongs” means killing your ethnic enemies.

    I recently returned from three weeks in East Africa, examining micro-development projects run by Africans for Africans. What a good news story. But bad news is like bad money — it drives out the good. Across the continent I encountered Zimbabweans who recounted the last four years’ terrible spiral of events, as Mugabe’s corrupt government turned Zimbabwe from a food exporter to a land stalked by famine. The past 30 months have been dreadful. The GDP has shrunk 25 percent, with inflation up 135 percent.

    Mugabe’s taste for tribal brutality isn’t new. In 1980, with the aid of North Korean military advisers, Mugabe’s Shona tribe savaged the Matabele tribe. From seven to ten thousand Matabele were killed. The world ignored the attacks. At the time, Mugabe was a hero to “global progressives,” having toppled the white racist regime of Ian Smith in the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia.

    Now comes a report from The London Times that indicates Mugabe intends to pull a Milosevic-style Kosovo on the Matabele, with an even larger body count. The document opens with this breathless passage: FOR THE EYES OF THE SHONA ELITE ONLY! PLEASE PASS TO MOST TRUSTED PERSON! PROGRESS REVIEW ON THE 1979 GRAND PLAN.”

    The document was obtained by Matthew Parris. Parris once served in the Rhodesian government, so he’ll be dismissed by “progressives.” Given Mugabe’s track record and the bitter fact of Rwanda, that would be a terrible mistake.

    According to Shona tribal history, in the 19th century, the Matabele entered Shona country (after fleeing Zulus) and took Shona land. Parris describes it as a “narrative” that fits the Shona’s “tribal nationalism,” just like Milosevic’s “Kosovo recovery” fit into a Serb litany of historical wrong.

    The Shona now live in central and northern Zimbabwe and comprise 70 percent of Zimbabwe’s 13 million people. The Matabele are around 15 percent.

    The “Grand Plan” outlines a political, cultural and genocidal campaign for pushing the Matabele back into South Africa.

    Mugabe has systematically kicked Zimbabwe’s white farmers out of the country and given those farms to his henchmen. Famine is the result. Now, Mugabe must distract the hungry, and an anti-Matabele campaign serves Mugabe’s immediate political needs. Parris is even more blunt: “… a fight with the Matabele would enhance Mugabe’s troubled position among his own people.”

    Here’s a key line in the Grand Plan: “For many years both the Ndebeles (Matabele) and Europeans were living under a shameful illusion that the crimes of their forefathers had been forgiven … This was not to be as (Mugabe) the illustrious son of the Shona people ensured that the two groups pay dearly for the evil deeds of the ancestors.”

    These deeds included rape and looting. So what’s the Grand Plan’s means of rectification? The rape and looting of the Matabele.

    Could the Grand Plan be a forgery instead of Mein Kampf? Sure. Mugabe, however, has been stoking these ethnic hatreds.

    The Shona, however, are no monolith. Many Shona oppose Mugabe. The Matabele are also capable of resisting.

    But what happens if ethnic savagery begins? Send British paratroopers? That’s a thought, though Mugabe would portray that as the return of the white colonialists. The real regional peacekeeper is South Africa. Though the South African government has shied away from involving itself with Zimbabwe’s internal troubles, it cannot ignore a genocide on its northern border.

  4. warvet May 6, 2013 at 10:39 am #

    gvnt pliz help

  5. Phunyukabemphethe May 6, 2013 at 11:08 am #

    Zim Independent

    Shona administrators must prove they are capable
    By Kudakwashe Marazanye
    I WAS moved by Zimbabwe Saints supporters who were singing with nostalgia
    about their team’s good old days, “.mutserendende, mutserendende,
    mutserendende Dr Love Matavire. ndakambonetsa. kumira neni aive makomborero
    mumvuri womuvonde.”

    Just like Matavire Chikwata chakambonesta and their supporters once walked
    tall. I could not help reminiscing over the good days at Saints.

    Which Saints fan does not have fond memories for the Super Saints of Ephraim
    Chawanda, Henry Mckop, Joseph Machingura etc? I still remember how the
    Saints family was crestfallen when we lost a final to a Shakeman
    Tauro-inspired Caps United in 1979. Aah! Vakomana, choenda here Chikwata?
    With such a distinguished footballing history, what has gone wrong at the
    once-famed Chikwata?

    There is a discernable trend of Shona failure in this and many other cases
    of administrative bungling in this country. Unfortunately this trend only
    serves to reinforce long held stereotypes of Shona dishonesty and bad
    management. Traditionally, whites have had contempt for the cowardly and
    ignoble Mashona and grudging respect for the proud and brave Ndebele.

    The Ndebele had and still harbour contempt for the fickle amasvina. The
    Ndebele still have an unkind refrain about the Shona – thathekile mota
    yamasvina. When in a charitable mood, the Ndebele argue that the problem
    with the Shonas is that they are full of I know, omaningindaba,
    vanamandihindini. So, traditionally, the Shona have always been at the
    bottom of the ethnic pecking order.

    That is why most whites would have preferred a Ndebele government to a Shona
    one in 1980. In their view, Ndebele hands in government were more
    responsible than Shona ones. After all they had wrested the country from the
    Ndebele on their arrival. Even during the liberation war, it was generally
    held that Zipra cadre were a more professional force than Zanla’s army of
    contemptible garden boys turned terrorists. Peter Godwin says as much in his
    book Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa. With the current problems our country is
    facing, blamed mainly on mismanagement, white liberals are quick to distance
    themselves from President Robert Mugabe declaring that “. I was an Inkomo
    man.”

    Against such a background, it is in the interest of the Shona to prove
    history and their detractors wrong. But instead, the Shona seem to be hell
    bent on confirming such prejudices about their ethnic group. Dynamos and
    Saints are both Shona clubs and they are both in an administrative mess. It
    is a scandalous shame that the Shona in Bulawayo now have to turn to
    Highlanders for a soccer team to root for after the demise of Saints. Even
    the Shona players in Bulawayo have to go to Highlanders to launch a career
    in football when in the past they naturally went to Saints.

    Generations of Ndebele and Shona youngsters in Bulawayo had a healthy,
    non-antagonistic rivalry on the soccer pitch to establish which group of
    youths was better. This good-natured rivalry extended to the members of the
    two ethnic groups at work places and in the various drinking places.

    The kind of friendly rivalry you see in Amakhosi’s Foromani and Sakhamuzi.

    But with the demise of Saints, Shonas in Bulawayo now shamelessly consider
    themselves as members of the Highlanders family, both as players and
    supporters. This is despite the humiliating taunts they are subjected to
    like “okungama buya-buya lokhu; .okungamasvina lokhu.” as correctly depicted
    by Amakhosi at the Highlanders Annual Prize Giving Day last year. At
    national level, soccer administration is largely in the hands of Shonas,
    with Leo Mugabe, a Shona at the helm. At this level the sport is also
    generally in the doldrums due to administrative incompetence.

    Apparently Ndebele administrative superiority over the Shonas is not
    confined to football. The city of Bulawayo is the country’s shining beacon
    in local government administrative excellence. Whilst corruption and
    mismanagement have cost Harare (and some Shona cities too) its glamour
    status, Bulawayo has been relatively well run. And Bulawayo, it must be
    remembered, is the heart and soul of Matabeleland.

    In business, Ndebele businessmen are generally known for their financial
    prudence and modesty. They are also known for their social responsibility to
    their Ndebele community – even though the money might have been made in the
    much-loathed Mashonaland. Over the years we have had Ndebele businessmen
    pouring money into Highlanders for its Champions League campaign and to
    sustain their foreign coach, Eddie May. We have had Delmar Lupepe coming up
    with his Amazulu, Titus Ncube and Chemist Siziba amongst others, sponsoring
    Highlanders. Of course the Bulawayo-based Ndebele businessmen would do well
    to discard their Bantustan mentality where they want the Bulawayo business
    arena to be rid of foreigners (read Shonas).

    The corollary to that warped thinking is that the Ndebele sons making money
    in Harare and other areas outside Matabeleland should be chucked out of
    these areas. So Delma Lupepe, Trevor Ncube, Tammy Msimanga and others who
    have thriving businesses in Mashonaland would have to close shop.
    Ultra-Ndebele nationalism may be good for Highlanders but it is certainly
    bad for ethnic relations. In contrast to the financial discipline, social
    responsibility and modesty displayed by Ndebele businessmen, Shona
    businessmen are given to obscene ostentation. They parade their opulent
    villas and cars, firing guns at funerals in the fashion of gangsters, which
    the less charitable say is exactly what they are.

    Parastatals headed by Ndebele boys also seem to fare better compared to
    those run by their Shona counterparts.

    The Zimbabwe Investment Centre under Nicholas Ncube and the then Cotton
    Marketing Board under Sylvester Nguni were some of the better run
    quasi-government organisations.

    From the foregoing, it is clear that the Shona may well have earned a
    reputation as incompetent, out and out crooks driven by the love for money,
    much like the Nigerians. This does not do any good to their tribe’s standing
    in society, and they should work hard to correct such perceptions and
    stereotypes.

    Because of these negative stereotypes of Shonas, there has been muted talk
    in some circles about whether things wouldn’t have been better in Zimbabwe
    under the late Joshua Nkomo and his PF-Zapu.

    l Kudakwashe Marazanye is a Harare-based freelance writer.

    marazanyek@yahoo.co.uk

  6. Phunyukabemphethe May 6, 2013 at 2:12 pm #

    Zimbabwean crisis that you created with your “PASI NAMANDEVERE, NGOMO ZIDUMBU, PAMBERI NABAMUGABE” Gukurahundi nonsense.

    Now you want me/us Mthwakazi to help you out of your SEWERAGE shit – never, MORE FIRE!!!

  7. TIM May 6, 2013 at 4:00 pm #

    @Phunyukabemphethe YOU ARE FULL OF SHIT….MASVINGO WILL SURVIVE THE IS ALSO A DROUGHT IN MAT SOUTH….WE WILL SURVIVE NO MATTER WHAT..MUSATANYOKO

    • Phunyukabemphethe May 6, 2013 at 5:18 pm #

      More fire!!!!

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