FUZ demands player insurance

0
378

The Footballers’ Union of Zimbabwe (FUZ) is pushing for Premiership clubs to fully insure their players ahead of the 2012 season.

The player representative body said it will this week engage the Premier Soccer League (PSL) and try to sell the idea that footballers need indemnification in case of career-ending injuries or other duty-related accidents.

Lower division clubs will also be asked to insure their players.

FUZ secretary-general Paul Gundani said when the International Federation of Professional Footballers (Fifpro) visited the country last month, it noted FUZ was making great strides in fighting for players’ rights and welfare, but recommended that every club should insure its players.

Fifpro Africa Division officials Stephane Saint-Raymond (communications director), Stephane Burchkalter (secretary-general) and board member Thulaganyo Gaoshubelwe were in the country early last month and urged FUZ to demand insurance policies for players.

“It is a must that all players should be insured. Remember players are assets to clubs, so assets need to be insured just like in any other organisation. There is no way a professional league should be operating with clubs that do not cater for players’ insurance. We claim we have a professional league, but honestly what are we doing to make sure our footballers’ lives are covered?” said Gundani.

“Except for FC Platinum, all other clubs have no life cover for their players. We have noticed most contracts are signed by players state that there is medical cover and other insurance benefits, but on the actual ground there is nothing.

Our footballers suffer when their careers come to an end because they are not insured and retire with no packages or any other benefits.

“Pushing for players’ insurance is a project we have been advised to undertake by Fifpro. They asked us to craft a project proposal and pledged to help us in this drive.

“As FUZ, we will meet with the PSL this week to try and enforce clubs to get their players insurance policies.”